Secondary Schools | The Shakespeare Sessions

  • 26th Apr
  • 16:00
  • €100/€150 depending on class size.
  • Out reach
Workshops and classes
For more information on this event please contact 041 98 33946

The Shakespeare Sessions | Tailtiu Theatre in association with the Droichead Arts Centre | Jan – April 2019

Are you sick of Shakespeare? Bored of the bard? Is your head melted with iambic pentameter, technique, and motif? Well fear not as facilitators Barry Morgan and Cathal Thornton will visit second level schools to offer workshops with a different approach to Shakespeare. By working closely with the Junior and Leaving Certificate English curricula, Tailtiu have devised a series of workshops to aid students in their understanding of these often-feared texts when it comes to assessments.

Cost: A 90min workshop with up to 20 students per class is €100 | A workshop with between 20-30 students is €150
Minimum number of students is 10 per session. Max is 30.
Days: Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays. Facilitatators will host workshops scheduled at a time to suit your school and class timetable. 

To book a workshop, please contact Rita on 041 987 5140 or email rita.mcquillan@droichead.com
Please download and fill in the Registration Form provided with your booking details. 

REGISTRATION FORM

 The themes include:

Tempest – Brewing up a Storm. How the language does all the special effects work!
Hamlet – "To be or not to be”  Why is this the most famous monologue ever written?
Macbeth – Scotland and the Supernatural  Examining the role of magic in the world of the play and how the characters react?
A Midsummer Night’s Dream – What Fools these mortals be! What is Shakespeare saying about audiences by staging a play within a play?
Henry IV, Part 1 – Friends in Low places Dissecting the relationship between Falstaff and Prince Hal.
Much Ado About Nothing – The Secret B’s  Comparing the hidden desires of Benedick and Beatrice to their public proclamations.
The Merchant of Venice – Shakespeare, Shylock and Antisemitism.  How Shakespeare capitalised on already existing hatred to create a villain. 
Romeo and Juliet – The Radical Romance  Is this play deserving of the most romantic love story ever?